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Virtual tour of the Minesing Wetland – presented by Dave Featherstone from the NVCA on Tuesday April 26t at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m.
Designated as a wetland of international significance and spanning an area of more than 6,000 hectares (15,000 acres), the Minesing Wetland is home to a diverse array of habitats. The unique assemblage of fens, marshes, swamps and bogs supports a network of sensitive flora and fauna, some rare or endangered.

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Our upcoming talk was identified as a “Must Learn” opportunity in the most the recent issue of “IN THE HILLS” magazine.

You can’t live in Headwaters without having an opinion about deer. You worry about them crossing the road. You love seeing them run across open fields. Or maybe you fret about your gardens or farmland – aka your local deer family’s favourite salad bar – and wonder when hunting season begins.
If you’d like to learn more about the species we share our space with, head to the Upper Credit Field Naturalists speaker’s night on Tuesday, March 29 for Deer Biology and Management in the Headwaters Region. Biologist Graham Findlay from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry will share the basics on the creatures and what goes into managing them in our area. The talk is free and takes place at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m. uppercreditfieldnaturalists.org

http://www.inthehills.ca/2016/03/departments/favourite-picks-spring-2016/

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Guided Blitz Registration is now open!

Join us for the 2016 Ontario BioBlitz in the Credit River Watershed on June 11-12!

The Guided BioBlitz is an opportunity for less-experienced nature enthusiasts to learn a bit more about their favourite species through field surveying and identification techniques – important skills for understanding the world around us. Our 2015 flagship event in the Don Watershed was a big success. Thanks to the 700+ registered participants and volunteers – we couldn’t do it without you!

The Guided BioBlitz is open to all ages and all experience levels, but be aware that sessions can require a lot of walking. Please also note that there can be a 40 minute drive between Guided BioBlitz sites.

Visit bdswiss abgeltungssteuer to register for sessions, look at the map of the Guided Blitz sites, and download a copy of the schedule.

Most sessions are limited to 30 people per group, and will fill up quickly – so make sure to register early! Participants will be contacted with more information about their particular session shortly after registration closes, on May 20th, 2016.

As always, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, we would be happy to answer them – just send us an e-mail at  mit binären optionen reich geworden, or binäre optionen negative erfahrungen for more info.

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Whether you’d like to participate in this spring’s Bio Blitz or learn more about the wildflowers or dragonflies, butterflies and moths in your backyard, you might be interested in these events organized by neighbours to the east — the Oak Ridges Moraine Land Trust. anyoptions 

Wildflowers of York Region – April 11th

Spring is almost here. What is sprouting in the forests and meadows around Aurora? Learn about native wildflowers, how to grow them, and where you can expect to see them.

Location:  Aurora Public Library, Magna Room Monday April 11th from 7pm  9pm.  Space is limited so please pre-register with the Oak Ridges Moraine Land Trust at 905-853-3171 ext 30 or at optionen handel lernen

Dragonflies, Butterflies and Moths – Oh My! – May 16th

So many things are buzzing in the neighbourhood. Come and learn about some of the most beautiful things with wings in York Region.

Location:  Aurora Public Library, Magna Room Monday May 16th from 7pm  9pm.  Space is limited so please pre-register with the Oak Ridges Moraine Land Trust at 905-853-3171 ext 30 or at optionen handel lernen

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Bring your – skulls, minerals, fungi an so on for the nature nugget table, books for the nature book exchange table, samples that you want to view with the microscopes that will be available. If you haven’t already sent in images or reserved a table for a display there is still time to do so. Contact Ron Jasiuk at rjasiuk@sympatico.ca

2016 Mem night Contr

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The Letter “P X 3” – Can you name the “P” creatures?

The first “P” has chewed the bark off of at least 57 Red Pine tress in a small area of the Alton Grange. Interesting that numerous Hemlock and scattered deciduous saplings were untouched except for one sapling.

The second “P” was calling throughout the Hockley Valley Nature Preserve. This very large excavation was found this past Monday before the snow arrived.

The third “P” at least 36 of them took over our bird feeders once the temperatures dropped accompanied by the falling snow.

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Our next field trip will be a Geology and Geomorphology Field Trip on Saturday Feb 13th. If you are a member of the Upper Credit Field Naturalists Club, you should have received a more detailed notice. If you are not a member … well …

Our goal is to help us all learn how to see our local landscape in a way that’s more inter-connected and explicable than just seeing it as pretty and hilly.

We’re going to look first at the general area of the old Orangeville brickworks, and get some idea of how that mix of clay and marl was deposited some 12,000 years ago. That involves learning about the Alton moraine plug that was dropped by the last glacial advance in this area when a lobe of ice temporarily moved back northwest across what is now Lake Ontario during a brief period of regrowth of the otherwise retreating glaciers. Then we’ll wander across that moraine plug of hummocky hills north and west of Alton, training our eyes to the particular look of end moraines.

So far, this will be studying geomorphology, here focusing on the effects of glaciers in this area. Our next major stop will be down in the Belfountain area, when we take a brief hike across remarkable bouldery terrain to the Devil’s Pulpit overlook for a stunning look at how the glaciers roughly carved the solid escarpment. This valley will be our first look at a re-entrant valley, though later on in the trip we’ll traverse the much larger Hockley Valley which was also partly gouged out by the glacier.

From there, we’ll take a look at the Cheltenham Badlands. Although this is now closed off, we’ll be able to see it from the side of the road. Among other topics here, will be how this feature is actually the direct result of recent human activity and is not really a natural landscape. Which of course, raises questions about how it should be preserved.
Then we’ll continue ahead to look at the most dramatic impact of humans on our local landscape — the Caledon gravel pits. That economically essential sand and gravel deposit was left by the glaciers. Here, we’ll think about the various impacts of our human actions, and then think ahead to what this area could become — and how we might influence that process.
We’ll then head up Kennedy Road, turning east along Highway 9 to climb up the eastern side of the Orangeville Moraine. This feature forks around Orangeville and reasonably clearly shows where three lobes of the ice sheet met overtop of present-day Orangeville. We’ll then head up the Third Line, dropping down into the Hockley Valley, perhaps looking at another exposure of what is in our area the bottom of the Niagara Escarpment at the Red Mud Cliffs. From there, we’ll head further up the Third Line and switch over to the Fourth Line, tracing the dramatic spillway where huge amounts of water flowed off the melting ice lobes, and drained across Orangeville, and down through Hillsburgh into what is now the Grand River and into the present-day Lake Erie.
This brings us back to the beginning feature of our tour, because it was the interruption of this spillway that led to the marl beds southwest of Orangeville and the subsequent re-routing of the meltwaters down the present Credit River.

(Mark Whitcombe)

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The Devil’s Pulpit overlook of the re-entrant valley near Belfountain

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A word that I have not uttered or thought about for probably thirty years popped into my head when looking at this picture of …….Lenticels. Although I was able to associate the word with the horizontal lines found on the Birch tree trunk I remembered nothing about the structure or function of Lenticels.

“Raised circular, oval or elongated areas on stems and roots are known as lenticels.” After reading this I saw lenticels everywhere..on my carrots, beets, apples, potatoes and houseplants.

Lenticels function as pores to allow for the exchange of gases. It’s how tissues within stems, trunks and roots get oxygen.

For some tree species such as the Pignut Hickory and Northern Spicebush, the shape of the lenticels can help with winter identification.

http://www.namethatplant.net/gallery/gallery_glossary.shtml?term=lenticel

Split Rock side trail, Bruce Trail, Mono, ON

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On Tuesday Jan. 26th, Phil Bird from the CVC will be giving an illustrated talk about some of the unique fishes found in the Credit River watershed.

Presentation will start at 7:30pm at the Orangeville & District Seniors Centre, 26th Bythia Street, Orangeville.

Did you know that all of the fishes shown below are found in the Credit River?

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WHAT’S BETTER THAN AN “ELF ON THE SHELF”?
HOW ABOUT AN “ERMINE EATING YOUR VERMIN.”
Orangeville residents Kirsten and Carmen Plester have a weasel living in their garage. Kirsten managed to photograph the very curious and seemingly unafraid weasel with her cell phone. The Plesters suspect that this little carnivore has been feeding on mice and Chipmunks.
They’re hoping to get another look at it in order to determine whether it is a Long-tailed Weasel, a Short-tailed Weasel or a Least Weasel.

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 It was surprising to find that the best sources of information about these three species of weasel was from websites geared towards fur trappers such as this http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/…/wildlife/trapping/docs/weasel.pdf and http://www.furmanagers.com/#!weasel/czxh

FYI: In a 2012 article on Least Weasels by Gilbert PROULX in Canadian Wildlife and Biology Management said “The Least Weasel (Mustela nivalis) is the smallest carnivore of Canada….no ecological studies were conducted on this species….The absence of field work on the Least Weasel in Canada….I argue that the lack of interest in Least Weasel research is due to its body size and elusive behavior, its difficulty to study, and its poor economic value.”

Once again it’s surprising to realize how little we know about a “common?” species.