Category Archives: speaker

Speaker

John Muir in our Headwaters area!

Our Southern Ontario area plays a special role in the development of what we now call the environmental movement.  Few of us know much about this pivotal role.

Starting in the Spring of 1864, the young Scotsman turned American, John Muir, spent several months botanizing through Southern Ontario. This was his first real exploratory trip beyond his adopted home farm in Wisconsin.

It was over in the Pottageville Swamp area (what was then part of the much larger Holland Marsh) that he had one of his most significant events of his lifetime, seeing a rare northern orchid, Calypso borealis. This epiphany started him on his way to dedicate the rest of his life to the preservation of the natural world.

“The rarest and most beautiful of the flowering plants I discovered on this first grand excursion was Calypso borealis (the Hider of the North). I had been fording streams more and more difficult to cross and wading bogs and swamps that seemed more and more extensive and more difficult to force one’s way through. Entering one of these great tamarac and arbor-vitae swamps one morning,holding a general though very crooked course by compass, struggling through tangled drooping branches and over and under broad heaps of fallen trees, I began to fear that I would not be able to reach dry ground before dark, and therefore would have to pass the night in the swamp and began, faint and hungry, to plan a nest of branches on one of the largest trees or windfalls like a monkey’s nest, or eagle’s, or Indian’s in the flooded forests of the Orinoco described by Humboldt.

“But when the sun was getting low and everything seemed most bewildering and discouraging, I found beautiful Calypso on the mossy bank of a stream, growing not in the ground but on a bed of yellow mosses in which its small white bulb had found a soft nest and from which its one leaf and one flower sprung. The flower was white and made the impression of the utmost simple purity like a snowflower. No other bloom was near it, for the bog a short distance below the surface was still frozen, and the water was ice cold. It seemed the most spiritual of all the flower people I had ever met. I sat down beside it and fairly cried for joy.

“It seems wonderful that so frail and lovely a plant has such power over human hearts. This Calypso meeting happened some forty-five years ago, and it was more memorable and impressive than any of my meetings with human beings excepting, perhaps, Emerson and one or two others.” (John Muir, re-published in The Life and Letters of John Muir,1924 (After his death))

Calypso orchid (photo by Robert Burcher)

Calypso orchid (photo by Robert Burcher)

Sometime during June of that year, he passed through our Headwaters area, walking westwards along the Hockley Valley from the Holland Marsh to the Luther Marsh. Later that year, he ended up outside of Meaford working in a rake-making factory. When the mill burnt down in the winter of 1866, Muir returned to the United States.

Muir ended up in California where he started the Sierra Club, still one of the leading environmental action organizations.  He is regarded as one of the fathers of the American National Parks system.

John Muir

John Muir

Robert Burcher is a member of the now-defunct Canadian Friends of John Muir.  Burcher is a photographer, a journalist, an author, and an experienced speaker. He is currently doing field work for his latest book on the experiences that John Muir had in Ontario.

Our Speakers for the coming year!

(Check the Speakers page for more details and for updates!)

Thanks to the work of your club executive, here is the quick listing of the speakers who will be presenting to us this coming year!

September 27, 2016:  John Muir in Ontario, including in our Headwaters area!:  Robert Burcher

October 25, 2016:  Orchids of Ontario:  our own member, Kevin Tipson!

November 29, 2016:  Astronomy 101:  Jason Tabroff, Dufferin Astronomy Club)

January 3,1 2017:  A Botanist Traces Spring Northwards along the Bruce Trail:  Mark Whitcombe, our President

February 28, 2017:  UCFNC Member’s Night

March 28, 2017:  Bees, Identification and Pollination:  Victoria Macphail

April 25, 2017:  Ontario Coyotes: Erica Newton is a scientist who works for the Ministry of Natural Resources, and has engaged in research about a variety of animal species, including wolves and coyotes. Erica will explain the differences between wolves and coyotes, and talk about the animals that we see in our area.  What is a coy-dog?  What is a coy-wolf?  How do we live with these animals in our communities?

senescent White Trillium (by Mark Whitcombe)

A senescent White Trillium (by Mark Whitcombe)

A Virtual Tour of Minesing Wetland – Speakers Night – Tuesday April 26th

A virtual tour of the Minesing Wetland – presented by Dave Featherstone from the NVCA on Tuesday April 26t at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m.
Designated as a wetland of international significance and spanning an area of more than 6,000 hectares (15,000 acres), the Minesing Wetland is home to a diverse array of habitats. The unique assemblage of fens, marshes, swamps and bogs supports a network of sensitive flora and fauna, some rare or endangered.

MinesingWetlands_001 MinesingSilverMaple minesing-wetlands-conservation 0__Picture 029

Speaker’s Night Topic a “Must Learn” Opportunity

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Our upcoming talk was identified as a “Must Learn” opportunity in the most the recent issue of “IN THE HILLS” magazine.

You can’t live in Headwaters without having an opinion about deer. You worry about them crossing the road. You love seeing them run across open fields. Or maybe you fret about your gardens or farmland – aka your local deer family’s favourite salad bar – and wonder when hunting season begins.
If you’d like to learn more about the species we share our space with, head to the Upper Credit Field Naturalists speaker’s night on Tuesday, March 29 for Deer Biology and Management in the Headwaters Region. Biologist Graham Findlay from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry will share the basics on the creatures and what goes into managing them in our area. The talk is free and takes place at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m. uppercreditfieldnaturalists.org

Our favourite picks for Spring 2016

The reason for FLAP (Fatal Light Awareness Program)

We installed new windows at home over the summer. Several times we’ve heard ‘thunks’ as birds hit the large shiny new window in our now-bright living room.

Then this …

The impact of a Mourning Dove on our new window …

The impact of a Mourning Dove on our new window …  (photo by Mark Whitcombe)

Look carefully at the photo. One wing extends right to the top and the other to the left edge; both legs show; individual feathers show; the breastbone clearly shows; individual feathers show …

The dove survived initially, weakly flying away after a few minutes. The next day at our feeder there was a dove with feathers missing from its head. But after that, there have only been two Mourning Doves in our yard, down from the three that we’ve had for the last while.

What is our living room with wonderful windows is not a living room for birds …

We’ve now put up stickers and hung window ornaments — with success so far.

Our next speaker from FLAP will be alerting us to ways that individually and as a society we can reduce the toll of birds hitting windows and buildings. FLAP (Fatal Light Awareness Program) estimates the number of migrating birds killed annually in collisions with buildings ranges from 100 million to 1 billion birds. Oh my …

(by Mark Whitcombe)