Author Archives: Ron Jasiuk

A Virtual Tour of Minesing Wetland – Speakers Night – Tuesday April 26th

A virtual tour of the Minesing Wetland – presented by Dave Featherstone from the NVCA on Tuesday April 26t at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m.
Designated as a wetland of international significance and spanning an area of more than 6,000 hectares (15,000 acres), the Minesing Wetland is home to a diverse array of habitats. The unique assemblage of fens, marshes, swamps and bogs supports a network of sensitive flora and fauna, some rare or endangered.

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Speaker’s Night Topic a “Must Learn” Opportunity

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Our upcoming talk was identified as a “Must Learn” opportunity in the most the recent issue of “IN THE HILLS” magazine.

You can’t live in Headwaters without having an opinion about deer. You worry about them crossing the road. You love seeing them run across open fields. Or maybe you fret about your gardens or farmland – aka your local deer family’s favourite salad bar – and wonder when hunting season begins.
If you’d like to learn more about the species we share our space with, head to the Upper Credit Field Naturalists speaker’s night on Tuesday, March 29 for Deer Biology and Management in the Headwaters Region. Biologist Graham Findlay from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry will share the basics on the creatures and what goes into managing them in our area. The talk is free and takes place at the Orangeville Seniors’ Centre at 7:30 p.m. uppercreditfieldnaturalists.org

Our favourite picks for Spring 2016

The Letter “P X 3”

The Letter “P X 3” – Can you name the “P” creatures?

The first “P” has chewed the bark off of at least 57 Red Pine tress in a small area of the Alton Grange. Interesting that numerous Hemlock and scattered deciduous saplings were untouched except for one sapling.

The second “P” was calling throughout the Hockley Valley Nature Preserve. This very large excavation was found this past Monday before the snow arrived.

The third “P” at least 36 of them took over our bird feeders once the temperatures dropped accompanied by the falling snow.

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The “L” word and they’re everywhere!

A word that I have not uttered or thought about for probably thirty years popped into my head when looking at this picture of …….Lenticels. Although I was able to associate the word with the horizontal lines found on the Birch tree trunk I remembered nothing about the structure or function of Lenticels.

“Raised circular, for sale oval or elongated areas on stems and roots are known as lenticels.” After reading this I saw lenticels everywhere..on my carrots, beets, apples, potatoes and houseplants.

Lenticels function as pores to allow for the exchange of gases. It’s how tissues within stems, trunks and roots get oxygen.

For some tree species such as the Pignut Hickory and Northern Spicebush, the shape of the lenticels can help with winter identification.

http://www.namethatplant.net/gallery/gallery_glossary.shtml?term=lenticel

Split Rock side trail, Bruce Trail, Mono, ON

Lenticels

An Urban Weasel

WHAT’S BETTER THAN AN “ELF ON THE SHELF”?
HOW ABOUT AN “ERMINE EATING YOUR VERMIN.”
Orangeville residents Kirsten and Carmen Plester have a weasel living in their garage. Kirsten managed to photograph the very curious and seemingly unafraid weasel with her cell phone. The Plesters suspect that this little carnivore has been feeding on mice and Chipmunks.
They’re hoping to get another look at it in order to determine whether it is a Long-tailed Weasel, a Short-tailed Weasel or a Least Weasel.

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 It was surprising to find that the best sources of information about these three species of weasel was from websites geared towards fur trappers such as this http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/…/wildlife/trapping/docs/weasel.pdf and http://www.furmanagers.com/#!weasel/czxh

FYI: In a 2012 article on Least Weasels by Gilbert PROULX in Canadian Wildlife and Biology Management said “The Least Weasel (Mustela nivalis) is the smallest carnivore of Canada….no ecological studies were conducted on this species….The absence of field work on the Least Weasel in Canada….I argue that the lack of interest in Least Weasel research is due to its body size and elusive behavior, its difficulty to study, and its poor economic value.”

Once again it’s surprising to realize how little we know about a “common?” species.

Annual Christmas Bird Count 2015-6

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SATURDAY JANUARY 2ND – SAVE THE DATE FOR OUR ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT More information coming soon about how you can participate in our local count. In the meantime find out more about this 100+ year old citizen science event that occurs all over North America, drug in many European countries and involves thousands of volunteers just like you.

http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count

cardinal & chickadee

(Ron Jasiuk)